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      Recipes & Guides

      Daily Matcha Preparation

      The key to perfecting your matcha skills starts with sifting.  Matcha is a micro powder with 2-3% moisture and requires sifting for proper mixing.  Sifting will allow matcha to distribute evenly, significantly improving the consistency and froth.  The second most important point is using your matcha while it is fresh.  The best by date on your matcha corresponds to the unopened package only.  The moment you open it and allow oxygen in you have about 10-14 days for optimal freshness.  Soon after the aroma will start to disappear and the matcha will gradually go stale.  Matcha is alive with nutrients and should be consumed while at its freshest.  We strongly recommend buying individual smaller containers so every time you open a new one it is as fresh as the first.  Happy whisking!

       

      Usucha

      Chawan Matcha Bowl
      Chasen
      Chashaku
      Sifter
      Matcha (approx 3g)
      Purified/bottled water (80ml) brought up to a boil then heat turned off

      Warm the bowl with the boiled water and wipe dry.  Soften the tines of the chasen by dipping into the boiling water and quickly whisking. Using the chashaku, add two scoops (One heaping, the second half the size of the first) of matcha to the sifter and sift by pressing through with the chashaku into the warmed bowl. Add water and whisk for about 60-120 seconds making sure there is no tea accumulated on the walls of the bowl.  You can even out the foam at the surface with the tips of the chasen tines. 

      Enjoy your matcha in 3-4 sips, while the tea is still hot!

       

      On-The-Go (with minimal tools)

      Teaspoon
      Sifter
      Matcha
      Thermos
      Liquid (Hot or cold filtered/bottled water or your favorite milk)
      Thermos

      Sift the desired amount of matcha by pushing through the sifter with the teaspoon directly into the thermos and then add liquid.  Close tightly, shake for 60 seconds, and drink out of the thermos or pour into your favorite mug!  If you take your matcha on the go and decide to drink it later, try not to add the liquid until you are ready to drink it since the matcha will oxidize if left in the liquid for more than 15 minutes. 

       

      Koicha 

      Koicha preparation is the most formal method in the tea ceremony and it demonstrates the true quality of any matcha.  When you form matcha into a paste the aroma and taste should be deep and pronounced and there should be no excessive bitterness, the scent will fill the room, and each sip should be enjoyed slowly and thoughtfully.

      Chawan Matcha Bowl
      Chasen
      Chashaku
      Sifter
      Matcha (approx 6g)
      Purified/bottled water (25ml) brought up to a boil then heat turned off

      Warm the bowl with the boiled water and wipe dry.  Soften the tines of the chasen by dipping into the boiling water and quickly whisking. Using the chashaku, add three scoops of matcha to the sifter and sift by pressing through with the chashaku into the warmed bowl. Add water and slowly knead the powder until it turns into a paste without any lumps and make sure there is no tea accumulated on the walls of the bowl. If the mixture is too thick, add a splash of hot water to improve the texture. You should not aim to create foam but smooth consistency. 

       

      Artemisia Matcha Latte Recipe

      Artemisia Matcha Latte Recipe

      This is the time of year when plants start to show their first buds although it will be a while before they begin to wear that beautiful fluorescent green of early spring foliage. During the days when the temperature is still cold, we enjoy a bowl of Black Matcha in the morning and Artemisia Matcha Latte in the evening.

      These two "Matcha" types are some of our most distinguished because they always bring up the conversation of "what is Matcha?" Both Black Matcha and Artemisia Matcha are powdered teas that are similar to the Song Dynasty style of tea making and the precursor to Japanese Matcha. Some of the main differences are prolonged storage and not having to sift before whisking due to the processing of these teas which fully dries them. Japanese Matcha has about 3-4% moisture and makes the tea extremely sensitive to storage while forcing the sifting procedure before making. Lastly, both Black and Artemisia Matcha foam up much easier with minimal effort!

      Artemisia Matcha is stone-ground Mugwort and has a delicious array of floral and earthy notes. We love adding a tiny pinch of Maldon salt to bring out some of the natural sweetness and use only milk for a thick yet delicate tasting latte. At the tea shop we always use Oatley Full Fat to create a wonderful foam but you can substitute your favorite milk.

      Artemisia Matcha Latte Recipe

      10oz cup
      4g of Artemisia Matcha
      8oz of hot milk 190F
      Pinch of Maldon salt (optional)

      Add Artemisia Matcha to a bowl and add milk that has been brought to a slight simmer. Using a Bamboo Chasen whisk for about 1-2minutes until it is frothy. Sprinkle on some salt at the very last moment and enjoy! Alternatively, you can use a thermos instead and shake it like a cocktail shaker or add directly into a milk frother. We recommend drinking matcha after it was freshly made as it will separate and continue to oxidize over time.

      Click here to order a subscription of our matcha selections

      Black Matcha Recipe

      Black Matcha Recipe

      This is the time of year when plants start to show their first buds although it will be a while before they begin to wear that beautiful fluorescent green of early spring foliage. During the days when the temperature is still cold, we enjoy a bowl of Black Matcha in the morning and Artemisia Matcha Latte in the evening.

      These two "Matcha" types are some of our most distinguished because they always bring up the conversation of "what is Matcha?" Both Black Matcha and Artemisia Matcha are powdered teas that are similar to the Song Dynasty style of tea making and the precursor to Japanese Matcha. Some of the main differences are prolonged storage and not having to sift before whisking due to the processing of these teas which fully dries them. Japanese Matcha has about 3-4% moisture and makes the tea extremely sensitive to storage while forcing the sifting procedure before making. Lastly, both Black and Artemisia Matcha foam up much easier with minimal effort!

      Black Matcha is a black tea stone-ground into a wonderful coco like powder and can be enjoyed traditionally with only hot water or your favorite milk. Depending on your preferred thickness you can use half water and milk or your own ratio.


      Black Matcha Recipe

      10oz cup
      3g of Black Matcha
      8oz of hot water 195F (substitute your favorite milk)

      Add Black Matcha to a bowl and add water. Using a Bamboo Chasen whisk for about 1-2 minutes until it is frothy and enjoy! Alternatively, you can use a thermos instead and shake it like a cocktail shaker. We recommend drinking matcha after it was freshly made as it will separate and continue to oxidize over time.

      Click here to order a subscription of our matcha selections

      The Importance of Water for Tea

      The Importance of Water for Tea

      The single most important part of making tea is the quality of water. Tap water contains heavy metals, chlorine, and fluoride that can negate almost half of the flavor and aroma in tea. For those of us who live in states where the water quality is not overly hard and comes from a good source, the implementation of a simple water filter is sufficient but filtered bottle water or spring water is even better. If you want to enjoy the most of your tea I urge you to reconsider what water you are using. It will not only benefit the taste of the tea but also the quantity of tea needed and the length of steeping to produce more flavor. The delicate nuances produced by carbohydrates, amino acids, and flavonoids in tea don't stand a chance when competing against chlorine and fluoride.

      Since ancient times, tea lovers have held the origin and quality of water in very high regard. It became a contest amongst connoisseurs to identify the source of the water being used. There are passages written about Lu Yu where he could tell that his lazy disciple drew the water from the bank of a famed river instead of walking over the bridge and dropping the bucket into the stream to draw the purest water. Some of the most famous water sources were wells, rivers, or even mountain creeks, and each had its distinct minerality, pH level, and taste.

      When it comes to enjoying a very high-quality tea, you absolutely should use good water! Some of our favorite bottles of spring water are Volvic and Fiji because of their near-perfect pH of 6.5 and you should avoid distilled water. At the teahouse, we use a two step filter that connects to our water faucet to fill our kettles and our ice machine for making iced tea. We've compiled a list of our most fragrant teas that will simply astound when brewed with good water. Enjoy!

      Ming Qing Long Jing - One of the finest representations of green tea made with extremely young tea leaves that are expertly pressed against a hot pan into a flat shape and infusing it with a delicate "smokey" aroma.

      Organic Buddha's Balhyo - A black tea that is lower in oxidation to preserve the delicate floral undertones from this hybrid varietal with a robust roast to make it taste like a perfect chocolate mousse! 

      Okumidori Tamaryokucha - Okumidori is a marvelous cultivar that expresses notes of Granny Smith apple with a slight white flower aftertaste and moderate amino acid levels (umami) with a refined baked taste. You will marvel at the beautiful emerald green color from the deep steaming. 

      Wen Shan Bao Zhong - This tea is often referred to as a green tea due to its extremely low oxidation levels yet it pungent floral appeal is a signature of the oolong family of teas. So bright with very little vegetal taste at all. 

      Da Hong Pao 2019 - One of the most expressive representations of this legendary oolong by using 18 different cultivars! It is a full bouquet of flowers that is waiting for you to discover with deep layers of roasting done over the course of five months. Each successive steeping reveals incredible undertones of taste and aroma that beckon the use of only the best water!  

       

      Ming Qian Long Jing Brewing Techniques

      If you are enjoying a fresh batch of Long Jing in the months of March - June, you can add simmered water directly into your gaiwan first then float the tea leaves on top and steep them for about 60s.  This will bring the water temperature down quickly and naturally and delicately release the taste.  Successive steepings, the water should be tempered by pouring into a pitcher first, then adding to the gaiwan.  Steeping can be kept to 10-15s increments. 

      Long Jing enjoyed in the summer that has slightly aged and lost some of that beautiful greeness but gained depth can be added to the middle of the water.  What I mean by that is fill your gaiwan only halfway with water from the kettle then float the tealeaves on top and top off with more hot water from the kettle.  Steeping times are the same for the first at 60s, then 10-15s for successive steepings. 

      Long Jing enjoyed in the Fall and later, add the tea to the bottom of the gaiwan bring and add hot water directly on top and steep for 5-10s for the first and then increasing by 5s for successive steepings. 

      Hope this will help you enjoy the many layers of taste to this magical tea!